How to fix something broken

Random thoughts

Month: October, 2016

Enlightenment

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A still from Steven Spielberg‘s 1977 masterpiece Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

There is a moment in our lives when we finally become aware of the real meaning of things. Or at least that’s what I believed and have experienced, and I believe it’s the path to follow.

As Plato described in his Allegory of the Cave, we were living in darkness and we eventually see some light through a slit, and by following it we get out of the shades and creep up to a place full of light.

Suddenly, that light blinds us, after having spent so much time in complete darkness. And when we start to walk we stumble, we probe and feel everything around us to make sure it’s safe. But somewhere in the middle we get too scared of not knowing what’s ahead of us and we quickly creep back to the den. We haven’t even given our eyes time to get accustomed to the light.

We prefer the dark. Funny enough, we’ve got to know as little about what’s in the cave, in that tunnel underground -since it’s so dark we haven’t even been able to go far enough to find out- as about what’s under the blinding sunlight. So, fear cannot be a reasonable excuse to remain in the dark. What’s more: if we had given our eyes time to get used to the light, we would have had a useful guide throughout the rest of the journey, as long as it may have been.

Even when being outside of the den the night might have come, we would have realised that darkness was just a temporary blackout; and that after those silent and mysterious hours, sunbeams would light our way again.

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A guide to deal with assholes

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Griffin Dunne lives a literal nightmare in Martin Scosese‘s cult masterpiece After Hours (1985).

Remember to repeat this mantra every now and then, in order not to go mad when you come across some asshole:

It’s nothing personal (you’re not the only one they behave like assholes with)

It’s nothing personal (you’re not the only one they behave like assholes with)

It’s nothing personal (you’re not the only one they behave like assholes with)

It’s nothing personal (you’re not the only one they behave like assholes with)

It’s nothing personal (you’re not the only one they behave like assholes with)

It’s nothing personal (you’re not the only one they behave like assholes with)…

But it’s oh so hard…

Memento mori

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Frances Conroy as the Angel of Death in American Horror Story: Asylum (2011).

Death or God are not the selfish ones: we are.

We cannot cope with the fact that we die at a certain time and we desperately hold on to life and those around us.

It’s only natural to cry and miss someone when they leave, but it’s not sensible or generous to deny Death when it comes. Not sensible because Death is part of living (just as getting old is), and we should learn to welcome it with peace and serenity, albeit sadness because we abandon life. 
Not generous because the selfishness and posessiveness that make us want to keep someone who’s about to depart by our side (or even ourselves) interferes with the process of mourning, which is necessary to leave this earthly world peacefully.

It should feel just as when you leave a place you’ve lived at for a long time, and people you’ve shared precious moments with.

We don’t have any rituals in our culture that celebrate Death in a natural and open way (or funnily, they’re all rituals that come from paganism). We live with our back turned to it, running forward to catch up with time, like Captain Hook running from the sound of the clock in the jaws of the crocodile.

Our culture is the culture of denial before Death. We should have a permanent reminder since childhood that prepared our spirit for that event. For Death is not the end, not even the worst of outcomes.

Just let the dying die.